Photobucket
Photobucket
Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Carter WA-1 Carb throttle shaft issue


Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 205
Date:
Carter WA-1 Carb throttle shaft issue


OK so I've got the right kit and the carb is essentially rebuilt.

The problem is the throttle shaft has wear on it and I'd like to find a replacement because I know it will definitely affect the performance. I've searched the net and there doesn't seem to be anything out there. There is some mention of re-bushing the throttle body, but the clear 'brassing' on the shaft suggests that a new shaft would be the better choice.

Anybody else had this problem? confuse



__________________

"Look Ma- no chassis!"



Poncho Master!

Status: Offline
Posts: 1138
Date:

Yes, I just sent a WA-1 out for a rebuild because the accelator pump was toast and it was leaking around the throttle shaft bushings. I didn't want to take a chance on getting an incorrect kit with the wrong accelator pump and I do not have the correct tool for reaming out the bushing area. It was a good thing I did it this way as this carb has two different accelator pump lengths and the company making up the carb kit needed the correct length. I sent it to Al Moffat who advertizes in Old Auots and I should have it back by the end of next week. The carb is from a 1950 Pontiac.

 

Al



__________________


Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 283
Date:

Over the years I have owned Chevs with the 216 engines I always found out they ran better with Rochester carbs!  Believe they are easier to find and kits seem readily available! I can also vouch for Al Moffat as he is very knowlegeable in working on these old carbs and has a ton of parts to use for repairs!  Bob.



__________________

1958 Parisienne sport coupe with 261 six.  One of 525 built! 

 

 



Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 205
Date:

Thanks. I'm contacting a vendor on Ebay who bought out a NOS Carter parts cabinet and is listing the inventory. Unfortunately the most of the stock has no part numbers. Hopefully they'll be a nugget in there for me.

Is it always necessary to ream and re-bush the throttle body? I thought the shaft was softer and would wear first before the cast iron.

__________________

"Look Ma- no chassis!"



Poncho Master!

Status: Offline
Posts: 2876
Date:

50sedandelivery wrote:

...Is it always necessary to ream and re-bush the throttle body? I thought the shaft was softer and would wear first before the cast iron.


 I believe you are correct. There needs to be an interference fit between the body & shaft, otherwise a vacuum leak could form. Brass is something that can be plated, and that might be what is necessary to restore the tight fit of the shaft into the body. There are numerous examples of hand-reaming to achieve a tight fit, e.g. the bearings in an old bronze bushed outboard motor of the 1919-63 era.

 

As an aside, 50sedandelivery, are you running a 216 Chevy six or a Pontiac 239 flathead six?



__________________

67 Chevelle Malibu Sport Coupe, Oshawa-built stocker 250 Powerglide 40,000 mile

Also in garage waiting: stroker 296 cid inline six & built TH350

Cameron Milne, Toronto.


I am a walking encyclopedia with numerous pages missing.



Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 205
Date:

Cameron:
I thought about re-chroming the shaft but it would probably come out 'out of round', due to the existing wear (about .003).
The Ebay vendor is checking his inventory and I've got all six fingers crossed (because it's a 239 six)!!
I'm hoping a NOS shaft will do the trick without re-bushing.

__________________

"Look Ma- no chassis!"



Poncho Master!

Status: Offline
Posts: 2876
Date:

I hear you. I was just saying that plating can add material thickness, perhaps it can then be turned down to a desired diameter. I was considering hard industrial chrome (NOT the shiny kind) for the journals on my old well-worn 1950 Johnson 5 to restore the tight clearance needed to eliminate pressure leakage from the adjoining cylinder on my old rotary valve 2-stroke. In the end I used a different block & crank that was within wear limits.

Another thing, brass has natural self-lubricating properties. Think of valves on tubas and slides on trombones. I doubt hard chrome has the same lubricating properties.

BTW, the 1950 Johnson is restored now. Here is a picture of it and a few "closet mates" that will get their turn at restoration. The bronze 1958 motor is a running 7˝ horse that I want to rebuild completely, while the 1967 Johnson 9˝ beside it just needs a lower unit reseal & impeller change.

 



__________________

67 Chevelle Malibu Sport Coupe, Oshawa-built stocker 250 Powerglide 40,000 mile

Also in garage waiting: stroker 296 cid inline six & built TH350

Cameron Milne, Toronto.


I am a walking encyclopedia with numerous pages missing.



Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 205
Date:

Wow- the 1 1/2 HP SeaHorse is beautiful! Had one just like it many moons ago. My dad had a 7.5 when I was a kid.

So- today a NOS shaft arrived. Right shaft but different lever so I have to do a swapperoo. The old lever is already loose so it should come off easily, but the NOS one is going to be a challenge since it's peened over.
Details at 11:00 - as they say!

__________________

"Look Ma- no chassis!"



Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 205
Date:

SUCCESS- at least it looks that way! I ground off the end of the shafts -old and new with my Dremmel (love that thang!) and was able to epoxy the old lever onto the NOS shaft. Fitment seems good so I'm a happy camper.
The true test will be when I finally get enough parts back on the engine to attempt ignition and lift off! :)

__________________

"Look Ma- no chassis!"

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us
.
.
.
.