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Post Info TOPIC: Synthetic Oil or Conventional in my Rebuilt 239??


Addicted!

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Synthetic Oil or Conventional in my Rebuilt 239??


I'm still confused about what oil to run in my newly rebuilt 239 C.I. 6 Cyl. 

I'm a big fan of synthetic, but I've heard it's not the best for our old iron horses.

I want to do a test fire soon but would like some opinions before I oil her up.



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"Look Ma- no chassis!"



Guru

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Break in period should never be synthetic.
I use AMSOIL in all my 2 & 4 stroke engines, regardless of age.

Break-In Oil (SAE 30) www.amsoil.com/shop/by-product/motor-oil/racing/break-in-oil-%28sae-30%29/
Designed for High-Performance and Racing Engines
Formulated without friction modifiers to allow for quick and efficient piston ring seating in new and rebuilt high-performance and racing engines. Contains zinc and phosphorus anti-wear additives to protect cam lobes, lifters and rockers during the critical break-in period when wear rates are highest.

AMSOIL Break-In Oil is an SAE 30 viscosity grade oil formulated without friction modifiers to allow for quick and efficient piston ring seating in new and rebuilt high-performance and racing engines. It contains zinc and phosphorus anti-wear additives to protect cam lobes, lifters and rockers during the critical break-in period when wear rates are highest, while its increased film strength protects rod and main bearings from damage. AMSOIL Break-In Oil is designed to increase compression, horsepower and torque for maximum engine performance.

Quickly Seats Rings
The primary goal during engine break-in is to seat the rings against the cylinder wall. Properly seated rings increase compression, resulting in maximum horsepower; they reduce oil consumption and prevent hot combustion gases from entering the crankcase. To achieve this, however, the oil must allow the correct level of “controlled wear” to occur between the cylinder wall/ring interface while maintaining wear protection on other critical engine parts. Insufficient break-in leaves behind peaks on the cylinder wall that prevent the rings from seating. The deeper valleys, meanwhile, allow excess oil to collect and burn during combustion, increasing oil consumption. Too much wear results in cylinder glazing due to peaks “rolling over” into the valleys and preventing oil from collecting and adequately lubricating the cylinder wall.

AMSOIL Break-In Oils friction-modifier-free formula allows the sharp peaks on newly honed cylinder walls (fig. 1) to partially flatten. The result produces more surface area for rings to seat against, allowing formation of a dynamic seal that increases compression, horsepower and torque (fig. 2).

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Guru

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Excellent info....Amsoil and Lucas products ,cant go wrong.

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AAK

Dorchester Ont



A Poncho Legend!

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regular dyno oil     nothing else      no one, has ever run a old car far enough, to prove the snake oil products work....



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I use DRIVEN BR30 break in oil by JOE GIBBS RACING because it has a very high ZINC content. The zinc is very important to make sure the camshaft and tappets break in properly and do not pound themselves to early death. This oil has everything for proper ring break in as well. It wasn't cheap, i paid $50.00 for four U.S. quarts. I just did the cam, lifters, gear set, push rods and rocker arms on my 57 Pontiac 261 inline six and used this oil to break in my camshaft. Another thing that is so important to your vintage motor, after you dump out the break in oil put a quality oil in there with some ZINC additive or an oil that has zinc in it. With out the zinc your camshaft will not last too long with today's modern oils. Zinc has been removed from most oils today because modern roller cam motors do not need the zinc but our early iron does BIG TIME. Also keep in mind you can not leave break in oil in there for any longer than say 500 miles or so, there are no detergents so your motor will start building sludge. Here is a list of high quality high ZINC content engine oils. Good luck with your fine flat head in line. Cheers. George.

Valvoline VR

Joe Gibbs

Royal Purple

Brad Penn



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Addicted!

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Thanks for the valuable information guys. I inquired at a local auto parts chain today and they carry a Lucas oil additive which has the high zinc content.

I'm going to order some Amsoil though and then as Longstroke advises, go with maybe the lucas additive later for the zinc.



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