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Post Info TOPIC: Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods?!?!


Poncho Master!

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Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods?!?!


Can't be a race car without a hood scoop, I say. Bad enough the proliferation of all those electronic boxes, now you have to have EFI - just throw that box of carb jets away, eh?

All those years of accumulated knowledge about carburetion, *poof* gone, replaced by some kid with a laptop. no

It is a sad state of affairs, me thinks.

Dave



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56Pontiac  1956 Pontiac Pathfinder 2dr sedan, 496 - dyno'd 545 hp, stick shift, 4.11 posi - Hot Rod

  1964 Acadian Beaumont SD convert, 283 - factory 195 hp, Powerglide, 3.08 10-bolt - Cruiser

  2012 US-built crew cab truck - Daily Driver and Boat Trailering



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RE: Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods


Just gotta keep up Dave. Plenty of carb's still out there, but I think why you see so much FI now is because so many guys runs turbo's. It's a crap ton easier to tune those correctly with a laptop, than risk nuking your engine if you 'guess' lean. The look of them is changing, but you can't argue with the results. It's not uncommon to see a junkyard 5.3 LS, single turbo in a 3000 lb car running high 8's...

 



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Uber Guru

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57 Pathfinder wrote:

Just gotta keep up Dave. Plenty of carb's still out there, but I think why you see so much FI now is because so many guys runs turbo's. It's a crap ton easier to tune those correctly with a laptop, than risk nuking your engine if you 'guess' lean. The look of them is changing, but you can't argue with the results. It's not uncommon to see a junkyard 5.3 LS, single turbo in a 3000 lb car running high 8's...

 


Dave, i hate to admit it but Rene is absolutely right. Modern times equals modern changes but i feel your pain and i feel the same way. Everything about drag racing has changed and other than the better safety, i do not like how high tech it is. That is why i only follow NOSTALGIA DRAG RACING. Modern drag racing does nothing for me, actually it just bores me to sleep. The old drag machines were exciting to watch and hear and it took drivers with guts and seat of the pants know how. Now i just see way too many computers for my interest to be there. Just my thoughts............... old school all the way. Cheers. George



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low milage original 400 V-8



A Poncho Legend!

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Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods?!?!


Put me in the "drifted away from watching NHRA" group. It's just not the same, somehow. And you are right George, even though the nostalgia stuff has all the latest engine building tricks inside, it still looks and sounds like the good old days, and it's FUN.

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1966 Strato Chief 2 door sedan 283 "survivor"


Poncho Master!

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RE: Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods


long stroke wrote:
57 Pathfinder wrote:

Just gotta keep up Dave. Plenty of carb's still out there, but I think why you see so much FI now is because so many guys runs turbo's. It's a crap ton easier to tune those correctly with a laptop, than risk nuking your engine if you 'guess' lean. The look of them is changing, but you can't argue with the results. It's not uncommon to see a junkyard 5.3 LS, single turbo in a 3000 lb car running high 8's...


Dave, i hate to admit it but Rene is absolutely right. Modern times equals modern changes but i feel your pain and i feel the same way. Everything about drag racing has changed and other than the better safety, i do not like how high tech it is. That is why i only follow NOSTALGIA DRAG RACING. Modern drag racing does nothing for me, actually it just bores me to sleep. The old drag machines were exciting to watch and hear and it took drivers with guts and seat of the pants know how. Now i just see way too many computers for my interest to be there. Just my thoughts............... old school all the way. Cheers. George


 Watch this guy hang on. Aussie HR holden,66-68. Turbo LS1

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qBgdW_KQz-g

 



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cutting a roof off a four door is NOT a convertible.....

65 Parisienne convertible project.



Poncho Master!

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Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods?!?!


Pro Stock don't run Turbos .....

NHRA spec. snorkel, ECM, throttle body, injectors and 10,500 redline.

Thanks
Randy

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Sherwood Park
Alberta, Canada

1981 Parisienne 400



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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RE: Pro Stock without giant hood scoops and big honkin' carbs ... replaced by electronic fuel injection and smooth hoods


Don't watch anymore (haven't for decades) list:

NHRA

NASCAR

NHL Hockey

They are all pure crap now!disbelief

 



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'64 Parisienne CS "barn find" - last on the road in '86 ... Owner Protection Plan booklet, original paint, original near-mint aqua interior, original aqua GM floor mats, original 283, factory posi, and original rust.



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koolconvertible wrote:
long stroke wrote:
57 Pathfinder wrote:

Just gotta keep up Dave. Plenty of carb's still out there, but I think why you see so much FI now is because so many guys runs turbo's. It's a crap ton easier to tune those correctly with a laptop, than risk nuking your engine if you 'guess' lean. The look of them is changing, but you can't argue with the results. It's not uncommon to see a junkyard 5.3 LS, single turbo in a 3000 lb car running high 8's...


Dave, i hate to admit it but Rene is absolutely right. Modern times equals modern changes but i feel your pain and i feel the same way. Everything about drag racing has changed and other than the better safety, i do not like how high tech it is. That is why i only follow NOSTALGIA DRAG RACING. Modern drag racing does nothing for me, actually it just bores me to sleep. The old drag machines were exciting to watch and hear and it took drivers with guts and seat of the pants know how. Now i just see way too many computers for my interest to be there. Just my thoughts............... old school all the way. Cheers. George


 Watch this guy hang on. Aussie HR holden,66-68. Turbo LS1

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qBgdW_KQz-g

 


 Phillip, that sweet looking Holden is just too wild for words................... I loved it.



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low milage original 400 V-8



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I just gotta chime in once more on this. I spent many years not paying any attention to NHRA. NASCAR, or much of any organized stuff. This age we live in should be appreciated though, because it makes it so much easier to find real grassroots racing easier. Stuff like Outlaw 10.5" I love. Bracket racing is kinda fun, but to me heads up is still where it's at and will always be the best. Dave, if you haven't already check out an event put on by Hot Rod called Drag Week. It's crazy, it grueling, it's amazing...and it's #1 on my bucket list.

Get on youtube and check out some of the new stuff. 1320video is a great channel. You might like this car even though it's a Ford. It has a hood scoop...

 

 

3.86 @ 212 mph in the 1/8th mile is pretty impressive. 



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