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261 Oil Filter


Hello! I just bought myself a 1961 Pontiac Strato Chief with a 261 L6. I noticed there was no oil filter installed. I searched this forum and found some answers but I was looking for something specific. Could I just mount a WIX remote oil filter somewhere near the motor than runt the lines from the motor? I'm not too worried about total originality but would like some filtering. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

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I believe this is where the 1/8 npt plugs are.



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This was the filter mount I was going to get.



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A Poncho Legend!

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I have no experience with doing it but I've seen that remote setup in the Wix catalogue at work and I sure can't see why it won't work for you.

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1966 Strato Chief 2 door sedan 283 "survivor"


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Do not waste your time or money on that setup. Just change the oil on a regular basis by following the manuals instructions.

Al

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Thanks Al, that's probably very good advise. Saves my money to put proper wheels on it.



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Taylor55 wrote:

Do not waste your time or money on that setup. Just change the oil on a regular basis by following the manuals instructions.

Al


 I agree with Al, forget the useless bypass remote oil filter setup and just use a quality oil and change it every year. The by pass system on these old 261 and 235's inliners do not filter all the oil all the time because it is not full flow like the V-8's or later generation sixes. Another thing is that these remote by pass systems rob 3 to 4 pounds of oil preasure from the system and that is something these old inliners do not want. Another ounce of protection would be to have a magnetic drain plug to catch any possible metal bits. I have an original remote bypass oil filter on my 57 261 but it is there just for looks. Cheers. George



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low milage original 400 V-8



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Thanks for the great info!!



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Jay, I'm in Morris. Are you related to all the Recksiedlers out here?

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1966 Strato Chief 2 door sedan 283 "survivor"


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When changing the oil add 1/2 bottle of EOS which is Engine OIL Supplement made for GM and sold at GM and AC Delco parts locations. This supplement adds protection for the camshaft and valvetrain components that the new oils are missing. I have been doing this on my 55 261 which now has 101,800 miles and still runs very strong. It will run at 70 mph all day with 30 lbs oil pressure and never get over half on the water temperature gauge. A couple of weeks ago I wanted to see what the top end was and it was still climbing at 100mph and the oil pressure was getting higher. I only did this once and for a very short time. If you look after a 261 it will run for a very long time.

Al

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Taylor55 wrote:

When changing the oil add 1/2 bottle of EOS which is Engine OIL Supplement made for GM and sold at GM and AC Delco parts locations. This supplement adds protection for the camshaft and valvetrain components that the new oils are missing. I have been doing this on my 55 261 which now has 101,800 miles and still runs very strong. It will run at 70 mph all day with 30 lbs oil pressure and never get over half on the water temperature gauge. A couple of weeks ago I wanted to see what the top end was and it was still climbing at 100mph and the oil pressure was getting higher. I only did this once and for a very short time. If you look after a 261 it will run for a very long time.

Al


 Al, i did the exact very same thing with mine and it is amazing how powerful these 261's really are. Like you i see no need to needlessly strain these old inliners and backed off, after all they are a long stroke motor made for torque needs. 



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low milage original 400 V-8



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I see you did a paper element conversion on your oil bath filter. Any tips on how to do?

 

Thanks!



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We're all related somehow in MB but my family comes mostly from the Beausejour area.

 

 



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long stroke wrote:
Taylor55 wrote:

Do not waste your time or money on that setup. Just change the oil on a regular basis by following the manuals instructions.

Al


 I agree with Al, forget the useless bypass remote oil filter setup and just use a quality oil and change it every year. The by pass system on these old 261 and 235's inliners do not filter all the oil all the time because it is not full flow like the V-8's or later generation sixes. Another thing is that these remote by pass systems rob 3 to 4 pounds of oil preasure from the system and that is something these old inliners do not want. Another ounce of protection would be to have a magnetic drain plug to catch any possible metal bits. I have an original remote bypass oil filter on my 57 261 but it is there just for looks. Cheers. George


 I see you converted to a paper element air filter. Any tips? I would like to do the same.



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Recks wrote:

I see you did a paper element conversion on your oil bath filter. Any tips on how to do?

 

Thanks!


 Jay, first remove all the original element mesh that is inside the unit, use needle nose pliars to do this. Make sure all of that mesh is out of there. Next get a one inch hole saw and neatly make numerous holes all around the inside body of the air cleaner, leave enough metal there so that it is still strong enough to support the unit. Put in as many one inch holes as you can with out effecting the integrity and strength of the inner body of the unit. Next step is very important, power wash the unit to the point of no metal shavings or mesh being left in there. I do not have to tell you what is going to happen to your motor if you run it with metal shavings or mesh debris in there. Next is to either metal cut the side of the oil bath bowl or do what i did, i used a 1956 Chev/Pontiac 265 two barrel air cleaner top. This made a perfect bottom cover for the air cleaner element as you can see in the photo. Failing that you will have to cleanly metal cut the side of the oil bath bowl with a reciprocating saw. Next is fitting a paper element air cleaner that not only fits sung over the inner body of the unit but also has the proper height, so that every thing sits level in the normal install position. Jay i used the Canadian Tire air filter part number  23-3188-2. Off hand i do not know the dimensions of the element but if you use that Canadian Tire part number it will be dead on. There is no need to mount any gasketing material because the top and bottom rubber on the paper element will act as the gasket. I hope all this is clear but i can not over stress that the unit must be fully clean with lots and lots of power washing. You do not want to mess up your motor by taking any cleaning short cuts. Hope this works for you. Cheers. George



-- Edited by long stroke on Thursday 15th of September 2016 12:09:54 PM

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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low milage original 400 V-8



Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 11
Date:

long stroke wrote:
Recks wrote:

I see you did a paper element conversion on your oil bath filter. Any tips on how to do?

 

Thanks!


 Jay, first remove all the original element mesh that is inside the unit, use needle nose pliars to do this. Make sure all of that mesh is out of there. Next get a one inch hole saw and neatly make numerous holes all around the inside body of the air cleaner, leave enough metal there so that it is still strong enough to support the unit. Put in as many one inch holes as you can with out effecting the integrity and strength of the inner body of the unit. Next step is very important, power wash the unit to the point of no metal shavings or mesh being left in there. I do not have to tell you what is going to happen to your motor if you run it with metal shavings or mesh debris in there. Next is to either metal cut the side of the oil bath bowl or do what i did, i used a 1956 Chev/Pontiac 265 two barrel air cleaner top. This made a perfect bottom cover for the air cleaner element as you can see in the photo. Failing that you will have to cleanly metal cut the side of the oil bath bowl with a reciprocating saw. Next is fitting a paper element air cleaner that not only fits sung over the inner body of the unit but also has the proper height, so that every thing sits level in the normal install position. Jay i used the Canadian Tire air filter part number  23-3188-2. Off hand i do not know the dimensions of the element but if you use that Canadian Tire part number it will be dead on. There is no need to mount any gasketing material because the top and bottom rubber on the paper element will act as the gasket. I hope all this is clear but i can not over stress that the unit must be fully clean with lots and lots of power washing. You do not want to mess up your motor by taking any cleaning short cuts. Hope this works for you. Cheers. George



-- Edited by long stroke on Thursday 15th of September 2016 12:09:54 PM


 Thanks George!!! I really appreciate this!!

 

 



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