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Post Info TOPIC: Power Glide Rebuild Price???


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Power Glide Rebuild Price???


My cast power glide has a bent park pin and needs new seals and I don't do tranies.  When I talked to guy in the business for decades he convinced me it should have a complete build.  Basically, it has 130,000 miles on it and the bushings etc. likely have wear and that will contribute to early failure of new seals.  Then came the budget price I asked for, $1,400 - $1,500.  Seems high but I haven't had a tranie rebuilt since the 70's so I'm wondering if anyone has had one done recently and wouldn't mind telling me if this is a good ballpark price.



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Addicted!

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I dont have an answer for you but

I just want to share with you the nickname

for these wonderful transmissions ...

I like to call it the Powerful Glide

 



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67 Parisienne Convertible 

67 Parisienne 2 Door Hardtop 



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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With auto repair in this area going at $125-$150 an hour I would be surprised if it was only $1500

to rebuild a powerglide around here.



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Glenn, get Rick Rood to work on it, he is very honest and the best guy locally on transmissions.

rickroodstransmission.com/

Id say your advice was likely good to replace seals and Rick wont lead you astray. I had a friend from Ottawa whose automatic blew up while on the 103 on the way home, it was a 700R, I asked a few people in Halifax who would be a good shop, no one had a name theyd recommend except Rick. He fixed their transmission in 2 days. He did my super T10 too. Tell him I sent you.
Hell probably tell you hed check it out inside and let you know what it needs. Ask him about the torque converter too, I assume its an aluminum or is it an iron glide?

He works on a lot of drag cars. 

Don



-- Edited by DonSSDD on Thursday 27th of August 2020 12:32:23 PM

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63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



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I am thinking more in the $2,000 to $2,500 range and that is assuming the drum is in usable condition. 



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



Addicted!

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I am quite fond of them as well!  Like the power and the wine they generate



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Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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2500 to do a PG? Why so much, appears there is really nothing to them. Are they tricky to build?

 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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Yeah I agree Mark they should not be anywhere near $2500. I watched the guy do part of mine and much of it is checking out each piece. Because they are such a strong transmission typically very little needs to be replaced. Its mostly just seals and little things like that. Bonus is if you have an old timer doing it he even has many of those parts around if you do happen to need something. As far as I know the guy who did mine is still doing some and he is in his mid 70s Im guessing. He was also smart and has many parts at his disposal.

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Jerel


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I had a PG on the 6 in my 65, sold it with the engine, but I kind of wish I had had kept it. Would have loved to have gone through it one day.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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Its true!  One of the things I really like about the 66 Beaumont with the 283 and PG is the lovely old tranny that just shifts once.  The whine of course brings back a lot of memories of the old family car my dad had.  Mine has probably over 100,000 miles on it and still feels crisp.

The only thing I sometimes wish I had on the longer trips is an overdrive.

Sure have changed my thinking from the day when the first thing you would do to a car you bought was to chuck the Powerglide.



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ken from northern Alberta

38 Willys pickup electric powered project

39 Buick (327 with 700 r4)

66 Grande Parisienne 396 with AC (built October 26 1965)

66 Beaumont 4 door hardtop

69 Chevy CST pickup

1976 GMC 23'  motorhome



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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I am thinking more in terms of pricing in the GTA (Greater Toronto Area). Hourly wages are high for a qualified transmission mechanic that knows his stuff. In the back woods of the hinter land it may be cheaper. 



-- Edited by long stroke on Friday 28th of August 2020 06:32:01 PM

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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



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Mr. Longstroke, who you talkin about? Backwoods? Greaser? Glenn?

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63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



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DonSSDD wrote:

Mr. Longstroke, who you talkin about? Backwoods? Greaser? Glenn?


 You are all fine gentlemen, i have no doubt. biggrin



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



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Car dealers here charge $150 or more per hour, we all get screwed equally? And the quality of the work has nothing to do with price.

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63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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DonSSDD wrote:

Car dealers here charge $150 or more per hour, we all get screwed equally? And the quality of the work has nothing to do with price.


 That makes me feel better, i thought only we were getting the shafter, it turns out we are all getting the shafter. This is just another reason that folks should do their own work. My moto has always been..... do your own work, no matter what it is. If you can not do it, then learn how to do it. Because once you know how to do it, you will do a far better job than some one that is a "worker". There is not only the money factor but also the pride factor. Cheers.



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



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I agree, learning how to do things to my old cars gives me a lot of pleasure. As an office type worker, ive enjoyed learning to work with my hands. Fixing my old cars, old house, daily drivers, outboard, doing carpentry, you name it.

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63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



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I agree Don and longstoke, I have always been a believer to learn how to fix something yourself and you often end up with a better job because it was yours you were motivated to get it right.  I just seem to have a mental block when it comes to transmission work it's the only thing I've not rebuilt, never even cracked one open.  It's the philosophy of you don't know what you don't know and what if I need special tools etc. that has kept me away from transmissions.  As for tools my philosophy is buy a good one, you'll always have it and it likely paid for itself when you used it.  How available are any special tools I might need to rebuild the PG?  I don't do failure well and would be quite embarrassed if I had to bring it to a shop in pieces because i couldn't do the job.  Now I've confessed



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Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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I'm glad to hear now a little bit of maybe diy coming from you. Do it yourself. You'll get a better and more satisfying result for cheaper. It's probably the best transmission for a beginner to start on. There are really no special tools needed to do an auto trans. Just good snap ring pliers, a bushing/seal driver set, a good 90 degree pick and a dial indicator along with a place well lit and clean to work on it.

Start with getting a book and study the crap out of it. amazon.ca. Go to the web and read everything you can about it. But don't get too drawn into modifying, keep it simple. Here's a overly complex factory type manual for it, but it has great drawings. OCMP

There are a plenty of Youtube videos tutorials out there to study as well. Buy a basic complete rebuild kit along with a shift improver kit.

When ready, document each step in photos, bag, tag and identify all the parts. We'll be here to help you along as you go. Make a post about it.

I did a 400 as my first, and it was hands down the most satisfying rebuild I've ever done.

 

 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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Glenn Musgrave wrote:

I agree Don and longstoke, I have always been a believer to learn how to fix something yourself and you often end up with a better job because it was yours you were motivated to get it right.  I just seem to have a mental block when it comes to transmission work it's the only thing I've not rebuilt, never even cracked one open.  It's the philosophy of you don't know what you don't know and what if I need special tools etc. that has kept me away from transmissions.  As for tools my philosophy is buy a good one, you'll always have it and it likely paid for itself when you used it.  How available are any special tools I might need to rebuild the PG?  I don't do failure well and would be quite embarrassed if I had to bring it to a shop in pieces because i couldn't do the job.  Now I've confessed


 Glenn, total agreement on all your points there. I have worked on Power Glides, Turbo 400 and 350's and yes they can look intimidating at first. There is so much information out there on how to tackle many transmissions. If you can rebuild an engine, you can do a transmission. Granted it is a lot of work, especially when we are doing it slow. No matter what i work on, i take my sweet time because i am not in any rush anyway. The pro's have to be quick and good, we just have to be good. Cheers.



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



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Automatic transmissions are really a simple thing of beauty, the complexity is in the engineering. A black art that really isn't.

If it currently has no drivability issues, just take it apart, clean it, replace the tailshaft bushing and low band, clutches along with seals, gaskets and the parking pawl.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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cdnpont wrote:

I'm glad to hear now a little bit of maybe diy coming from you. Do it yourself. You'll get a better and more satisfying result for cheaper. It's probably the best transmission for a beginner to start on. There are really no special tools needed to do an auto trans. Just good snap ring pliers, a bushing/seal driver set, a good 90 degree pick and a dial indicator along with a place well lit and clean to work on it.

Start with getting a book and study the crap out of it. amazon.ca. Go to the web and read everything you can about it. But don't get too drawn into modifying, keep it simple. Here's a overly complex factory type manual for it, but it has great drawings. OCMP

There are a plenty of Youtube videos tutorials out there to study as well. Buy a basic complete rebuild kit along with a shift improver kit.

When ready, document each step in photos, bag, tag and identify all the parts. We'll be here to help you along as you go. Make a post about it.

I did a 400 as my first, and it was hands down the most satisfying rebuild I've ever done.

 

Mark, said it all right here. All words to live by for sure.  

 


 



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



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This is a cast iron unit, any difference between them and the later aluminum glides?

How good is the information in the shop manual on working on a glide?

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63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



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All great points guys and you may have convinced me to tackle it. The glide had no issues shifting and I don't recall any dripping in the little time I had it before pulling it to start the restoration. I do know the park pin is bent, thanks to the car hauler, but that's it. I certainly could put the savings towards a wiper motor, carpet and tires, other than painting those are the major things I need now.

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Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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Just change the park pawl, seals and the tail bushing. Don't bother opening it all up if it functions fine.

But please do post with the progress! I'm interested in this.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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A Powerglide is as simple & lightweight a fully automatic you will ever find. The cast iron units are at least 70 lbs heavier. Unless you think the thing is smoked, you could probably do what is called a soft rebuild yourself without too much trouble and that will be all the doctor ordered. A pretty bullet-proof trans. Franky I am shocked by how well they are still supported considering how archaic they were even 55 years ago. Racers love them because they are light and soak up among the least horsepower, and they can be built to handle 1000 horsepower.

 

I always figured a drivetrain upgrade for my Chevelle was a matter of time, but as time goes on I'm glad I left it stone-stock. You don't know what you've got 'till it's gone.

 

Now these modern CVT's are quite simple but they can't handle any sort of power or abuse at all.



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67 Chevelle Malibu Sport Coupe, Oshawa-built stocker 250 Powerglide 40,000 mile

Also in garage waiting: stroker 296 cid inline six & built TH350

Cameron Milne, Toronto.


I am a walking encyclopedia with numerous pages missing.

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