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Post Info TOPIC: 3/16 Reverse flare sealing issues.


Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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3/16 Reverse flare sealing issues.


I'm having a bear of a time getting my master to rear line to seal at the union. Seems no matter what, I am getting a hint of weep. I took the advice from here, and built up to tightening, on/on and slowly. And I'm on the third line now. Second union.

Though I had it, but there is still a slight hint of weep.

First two lines, I used an vintage high quality American tool I'd acquired to do the flare. Both those lines wept at the union. Closer inspection (with a magnifying glass) of the lines reverse flare face showed pretty bad galling. And a good look of the cone tool (see image) showed the vintage one was worn out at the tip compared to the offshore. So I made the third line super carefully using the good cone. Tubing; Cut off with a Dremel wheel (no tubing cutter work harden), filed flat, beveled edge, clean. Correct hight and square to first die, oil, final cone not too tight, looked great and centered under magnification.

Still a slight trace of weep. Hmm

 

The next possible issue,,, I'm not seating the line flare centered on the seat? Any ideas? I've never had such an issue.

 

Sorry about the image size..

Old cone to the right,

wedge.jpg

first union seat,

un1.jpg

 

 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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I know a couple times that has happened to me Mark and I gave them another crank, much harder than I thought I should have to and that cinched it. One of the lines on my Beaumont now was one of them and its been perfect for 5+ years now.

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Jerel


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For this very reason I gave up on making my own lines many years ago. As far as I am concerned, pre made line is the only way to. You can not make a flair as good as a factory and there is too much at stake here obviously. I buy all my lines from John Stewart brakes in Stoney Creek, Ontario. They use a special tubing that is very easy to bend and will never rust, no not stainless. It is better than stainless and is so easy to bend. I just recently bought an eleven foot line for my 74 Chev and it cost me $35.00. It was well worth the cost. 



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1957 Pontiac Pathfinder Deluxe sedan restored 261 six

1974 Chevrolet Caprice Estate wagon low mileage original 400 V-8



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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Thanks guys,

I might give her just one more little crank Jerel. The only thing left is I might be off-center on the seat. it's a very short line and might be fussy to center, and maybe that is the issue?

George: You are 100% right, pre made are the ultimate (and I love John Stuart btw), but these are custom one off. And yes, those Nickle Copper alloy lines are the best. I'll be buying a roll of Nicop 3/16 next.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


Poncho Master!

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I have had some batches of brake line that was hard to double flare. I found that a bit of brake fluid on the line before I flared it seemed to help.

Paul

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A Poncho Legend!

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cdnpont wrote:

I'm having a bear of a time getting my master to rear line to seal at the union. Seems no matter what, I am getting a hint of weep. I took the advice from here, and built up to tightening, on/on and slowly. And I'm on the third line now. Second union.

Though I had it, but there is still a slight hint of weep.

First two lines, I used an vintage high quality American tool I'd acquired to do the flare. Both those lines wept at the union. Closer inspection (with a magnifying glass) of the lines reverse flare face showed pretty bad galling. And a good look of the cone tool (see image) showed the vintage one was worn out at the tip compared to the offshore. So I made the third line super carefully using the good cone. Tubing; Cut off with a Dremel wheel (no tubing cutter work harden), filed flat, beveled edge, clean. Correct hight and square to first die, oil, final cone not too tight, looked great and centered under magnification.

Still a slight trace of weep. Hmm

 

The next possible issue,,, I'm not seating the line flare centered on the seat? Any ideas? I've never had such an issue.

 

 


 What length is this line Mark?



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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 44,000 original miles "FAKE_66"



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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It's about 13" long Carl. Now, unlike the front brake line, I decided not to loop this line, as the fitting at the frame by the box was free to move up and down anyway. If I do another one, it'll have the loop.

Red dot is the trouble fitting.

Inkedline_LI.jpg

 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


Addicted!

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Too bad I wasnt closer, you could use my new flaring tool I picked up from Eastwood, it makes the best, factory looking flares I have ever done, even better than the Mac ones I picked up. 



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A Poncho Legend!

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I'm just wondering if you should go out and buy a ready made line just to try it. You should be able to get a 12" line with the flares done on it.

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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 44,000 original miles "FAKE_66"



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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Provided it would have the two different fittings required, that certainly would be an option.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


A Poncho Legend!

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It won't I'm afraid, you'd have to adapt.

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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 44,000 original miles "FAKE_66"



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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I'll try a tighten, it's so close it's just a hint of fluid on your finger after a period of time, and after pressure braking. 

The thing that drives me nuts is I've done plenty of lines, and never have I not been able to get around a leak. Actually, I think I'll buy a roll of soft Nickle copper 3/16 line and try making one more line. I suspect in the long run it'll need a front hold off valve and some new plumbing to go along with it. On the road it feels like all front brakes. Almost touchy, but certainly powerful, but it's too soon to tell.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 
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