Photobucket
Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Is there a thermal reset that would cause odd starting problem?


Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 491
Date:
Is there a thermal reset that would cause odd starting problem?


Had an odd issue happen with my recently acquired car when I went to change the oil.

Ive kept battery reasonably charged (negative cable disconnected) by putting on my little trickle charger occasionally so when I went to start car after 3 months it started fine but I only let it idle long enough to warm the oil to change it.  It still has an external regulated alternator and the alt light flickers at idle, going off at even a small increase in RPM.  Previous owner claims it always did that and never had an issue.  

The car has an Holley electric pump (due to Vortec era block with no mech pump ), that comes on as soon as key is turned to run.  As far as I can tell rest of electrical system is pretty much stock design except for dedicated 12V lead from Ignition terminal on fuse panel to + on coil for the aftermarket module in cap distributor. All wiring is in decent shape and fuse panel is in good shape with no corrosion.

After changing the oil went to start and turned key and pump hummed and sounded like starter just engaged and then dreaded solenoid click.   I had drivers door open and dome light on but without even thinking turned key again then a click and nothing and dome  light went off too and then no power anywhere.  I checked the battery and it was low 11.8 volts but not totally dead so I put trickle charger and went to check fuses and while I was doing that the domelight clicked on??  Its almost like the pump and starter overloaded the system and it shutdown??  i Checked wiring diagrams and didnt think there is any thermal circuit breakers but maybe Im wrong?  

Left the trickle charger on for like 15 minutes while I chased the electric pump wire as best I could and couldnt readily find anything.  

Scratching my head as to what happened I disconected the trickle charger and tried to start the car and it fired right up. 

Ill try to lift car again to see if theres something near pump I couldn't see as its tucked inside frame near passenger rear wheel and car was too low to look well. 

Is it possible I just killed the battery to point it needed to recover enough for even dome light to come on?  Thats the biggest question as the dome light just popped on after a short time, I didnt think to try other accessories when it happened.  I understand the issues of a dead battery but would like to understand what happened here for future reference and to address if I can  

Any other things it could have been?

Any input is much appreciated. 



__________________


Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 265
Date:

To quote a tech instructor I had many years ago, "90% of electrical issues are ground." With that in mind, I would triple check the major primary grounds and connections... battery cable to engine block and engine block to chassis before chasing any ghosts.
.

__________________

 

My name is ___ but you can call me Vern

- Professional beer can recycler - 



Uber Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 3509
Date:

cranks38 wrote:

To quote a tech instructor I had many years ago, "90% of electrical issues are ground." With that in mind, I would triple check the major primary grounds and connections... battery cable to engine block and engine block to chassis before chasing any ghosts.
.


 Exactly, check negative battery post, loose or maybe

corroded. Do you use one of those green battery disconnectS on the negative battery post? Ive had them fail. 



__________________

63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

Status: Online
Posts: 8114
Date:

I have the original band type battery connectors on my 67, and every now and then I get the same thing. A little tweak of the connections and she's good to go.

I'd say its a fussy connection on the battery.



__________________
65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


Addicted!

Status: Offline
Posts: 491
Date:

Thanks Guys, I checked the grounds and they seem good, in fact when engine was put in 3 years ago I can see they redid all the one from engine to body, engine to chassis, battery to engine etc so I think those are good. It does have one of those green quick connects on the battery negative so I pulled apart and cleaned up and registering exact same voltage at post ad downstream through the connector. So I think everythings ok but Ill keep looking things over.

To add insult to injury my LED light died while checking bulkhead connector so used my phone flashlight and dropped down inside front fender.....arghh. Luckily I was able to retrieve through splash shield....just barely. Lol.

Did find an extra large (12ga or so) pink wire coming out of the bulkhead connector that according to wiring diagram shouldnt be there, it appears to be spliced in with resistor wire at connector and guess it was done some years ago. Was all wrapped in with others so it looked factory but obviously wasnt. Its run to the electric choke.
1A063A42-0C8B-4E52-8D80-5A3BBC82315D.jpeg

 



__________________


Uber Guru

Status: Offline
Posts: 3509
Date:

A loose connection on as ground can test ok with a tester but lose the connection under load. Turn on your headlight and hit your starter and see if it youve got power.

Remove that green plug and go directly to the battery post.

__________________

63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC.
1963- Pontiac top selling car in Canada

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic

Page 1 of 1  sorted by
 
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us
.
Support Canadian Poncho!
Select Amount:
<
.
.
.