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Post Info TOPIC: Disc brakes


Addicted!

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RE: Disc brakes


I purchased a line bender Mark.



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Jim way


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Just a little thought.

Make sure you put the fitting on the line for each end prior to doing the bending.  Its an easy mistake to do.  

Make up a little stubby line with a fitting and feed that into the line you are making and use it to pull the line through the spots that you are working through.

This will eliminate getting dirt in the line as you navigate your way about. 

Hope this doesnt confuse. 

 

 



-- Edited by oshawacliff on Monday 10th of April 2023 02:49:43 PM

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Cliff

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Like the larger type for my eyes. 

 

 



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66sdguy wrote:

Which brakeline is easiest for a rookie. Nickle alloy. Aluminum, stainless?.


Copper Nickle by far. So great to work with, bend, double flare. Fairly Inexpensive as well. It conforms (to a limit) easily by hand.

Stay away from stainless imop. Simply too hard.

 

Cliff's hint about putting the fitting on first is a very good one. I've actually been caught twice... remaking the same line...

 

Flaring, what I've found;

 

Cut the tube with a Dremel cut off wheel (or even an angle grinder with a zip wheel).

Don't ever use the spin cutters, they actually work harden the flare. You want it as soft as the line material.

Use a small fine file on the cut end to make it perfectly flat/square.

Ream the inside of the cut end to eliminate any burr.

Blow the line out with air.

Fit your tube nuts. A little peice of masking tape to keep them from sliding down the line.

Use a drop of light oil on your first die pass fold. And another on the final foldover. You'll be amazed at the difference it makes in forming the flare.

Do not overtighten that final flare fold. Just lightly bring the die down. Too tight, you've crushed it, and taken away any give the flare needs to conform on the receiving fitting reverse taper.

Blow the line out again, spray brake cleaner inside it to be sure it's debris free.

 

 

 



-- Edited by cdnpont on Monday 10th of April 2023 04:17:31 PM

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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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I just finished replacing a bunch of lines on my wagon, and the copper nickel stuff is super easy to work with and cheap.

Wagon36.jpg

 

 

I spent $60 on this flare tool, but it's a must-have if you're repairing lines that can't be removed from the car.

Wagon42.jpg

 



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My 64 Safari build



Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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I've needed that tool a few times, no idea it existed Brian.



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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Jim, if you are going to flare and have never really done much of it, practice the heck out of it. It's very satisfying when you can get it just right.

 

I've learned to make a passable flare with the very crappiest Chinese Amazon flaring tool, but I've always lusted after something better.

I wonder how this Vevor flaring tool stacks up to the Eastwood? 

 

 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


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cdnpont wrote:

Stay away from stainless imop. Simply too hard.

 

Cliff's hint about putting the fitting on first is a very good one. I've actually been caught twice... remaking the same line...

 

Flaring, what I've found;

 

Cut the tube with a Dremel cut off wheel (or even an angle grinder with a zip wheel).

Don't ever use the spin cutters, they actually work harden the flare. You want it as soft as the line material.

Use a small fine file on the cut end to make it perfectly flat/square.

Ream the inside of the cut end to eliminate any burr.

Blow the line out with air.

Fit your tube nuts. A little peice of masking tape to keep them from sliding down the line.

Use a drop of light oil on your first die pass fold. And another on the final foldover. You'll be amazed at the difference it makes in forming the flare.

Do not overtighten that final flare fold. Just lightly bring the die down. Too tight, you've crushed it, and taken away any give the flare needs to conform on the receiving fitting reverse taper.

Blow the line out again, spray brake cleaner inside it to be sure it's debris free.

 

 

 




 Again I learned something. I've always used my mini tubing cutter. 



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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 45,000 original miles 

1966 Grande Parisienne, 396 1 of 23 factory air cars (now converted to a "factory" 4 speed)



A Poncho Legend!

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cdnpont wrote:

 

I've learned to make a passable flare with the very crappiest Chinese Amazon flaring tool, but I've always lusted after something better.

 

 


 I've tried cheap ones and can never get the flare centred. I bought a used Blue Point flaring tool off ebay a few years ago (local seller, we met in town here to do the deal) and I've been super happy with it. It was $35 but I think that was money well invested even though it's used. 



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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 45,000 original miles 

1966 Grande Parisienne, 396 1 of 23 factory air cars (now converted to a "factory" 4 speed)



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Disc's up front Mark. Drums in the back. To be clear. Do I need a residual valve in my MC for the back drums? As I understand this ...or at the least an inline 10 psi valve? As I  understand it I do.  



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Jim way


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Great idea Ponch master. Thank you



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Jim way


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Loven this tutorial. Gotcha.



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Jim way


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On the hunt for a blue point flaring tool. Thanks Carl



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Jim way


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66sdguy wrote:

Disc's up front Mark. Drums in the back. To be clear. Do I need a residual valve in my MC for the back drums? As I understand this ...or at the least an inline 10 psi valve? As I  understand it I do.  


 Your master doesn't have it. But it doesn't need to be integral to the master. It's certainly more convenient and cheaper that way, but a Wilwood (or any other brand for that matter) in line 10lb check valve covers the need just fine Jim.

 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


Addicted!

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Disc's up front Mark. Drums in the back. To be clear. Do I need a residual valve in my MC for the back drums? As I understand this ...or at the least an inline 10 psi valve? As I  understand it I do.  



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Jim way


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I have ordered a 10 psi inline valve Mark. Thanks



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Jim way


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Thanks Carl. 



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Jim way


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Is this master adequate for disc's/ drums if I install an inline residual valve?



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Jim way


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Masters can be a total unknown if you don't have a part number. The casting will tell you little of the bore size.

But with GM masters 67-70 (and maybe further), you are in luck. They mount the same with differences of pushrod depth, so you have basically unlimited options.

Do you have an image of it? 



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65 Laurentian post, 67 Grande Parisienne 4 door HT. 
 


A Poncho Legend!

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66sdguy wrote:

Is this master adequate for disc's/ drums if I install an inline residual valve?


 I've been following this thread and I'm getting confused. I think Mark already had replied that master with a residual valve should work perfectly? Or am I missing something?confuse



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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 45,000 original miles 

1966 Grande Parisienne, 396 1 of 23 factory air cars (now converted to a "factory" 4 speed)



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I did post a photo of the master but I don't think he confirmed if this exact one was OK. The only reason I was asking was a pal of mine looked at it today and commented he thought the disc brake reservoir should be larger than the drum one. This prompted my to try and get confirmation. My pal is a recently retired RCMP officer but was a licenced mechanic previous to that. He wasa a mechanic 30 years ago though. Lol 

 



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Jim way


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Yes, a disc brake master has a larger reservoir than a drum brake one. It takes more brake fluid move the calipers.

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70 2+2 convertible
70 2+2 hardtop
70 Parisienne hardtop
72 GMC Sierra

 

 



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Here are some photos of the master that came in my project SD when I bought the car.  MC did not come with a box. Nor a warranty card nor any paperwork. As per Mark I gently slid a paper clip into both ports on the master with zero resistance which tells me the MC does not have a built in residual valve. From what I read online I THINK I can use this MC as long as I install a 10lb inline residual valve in the back port on the MC which of course is the rear brake reservoir.



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Jim way


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Now it's time to decide on brake fluid.

..

 

 



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Cliff

Done Hurryin

Like the larger type for my eyes. 

 

 



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Thanks for all your help Mark. I learned a lot in our chats. A whole lot. I got this Appreciate your time very much. 



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Jim way


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66sdguy wrote:

Which brakeline is easiest for a rookie. Nickle alloy. Aluminum, stainless?.


 4 me go nickle.....alum wont last and SS will most likely crack when you flare. Seemes the nickle is most forgiving when double flaring.



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