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Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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my 63 283 Re&Re


Stuart, I'd be more worried that a "second time" pounded on balancer could come come loose. You could hand drill it in place no probs. The crank isn't particularity hard. I don't think it has to be 100% precisely square, just centered which should be easy as there is a machining center already there.

Just work your way up incrementally to Tap Drill Size, index "W" drill bit or .3860". Drill to to a calculated depth. Then run a 7/16-20 tap through. Easy!

32729293258_199b6b2b72_z.jpg

 



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67' Grande Parisienne. Ex Ottawa USSR Embassy car, 67- 68.
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IMG_0141.jpgIMG_0142.jpgIMG_0143.jpgIMG_0144.jpgHoly! What a great pic Mark. I'm definitely not a mechanic and I've never "properly" rebuilt an engine but I've owned a few and bought a few rebuilds, done quite a lot of re&re's and this sort of stuff.I get your point about second time on for sure.I have bumped one on about thirty years ago but didn't keep it long enough to see if it flew off! You guys are makin me worry about this..I'll have to drill with a jig cause I'm not taking the crank out ..hmmm I bumped it on with grease not loctite.. These next"curiosity pics" are of numbers stamped along the oil pan seal edge on the block. They are between the webs kinda in line with the rods...8,8,9,10,11,12,12,and 13....eight in total. Does anyone know what these might have been? Just a curiosity ( It's who I am) lol!



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A Poncho Legend!

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I have always speculated those numbers had to do with tolerances. My guess, and it's nothing more than a guess that could be COMPLETELY wrong is that on the assembly line the workers had boxes/crates of piston and rod assemblies waiting to install, each box/crate marked with a corresponding number.

And now hopefully someone here will be able to answer this correctly with a confirmed reason for those stampings!

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1966 Strato Chief 2 door, 427 4 speed, 44,000 original miles



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IMG_0147.jpgIMG_0146.jpgYa,the numbers do seem somewhat random. I had in my mind some sort of assembly line sequence as well....I scratched around and found a balancer washer a big thick one that has been with me for decades.I can't believe I found it! I do have a couple of 25/32 drill bits and a 2" 7/16 x 20 grade 8 bolt. 2" is cutting it tight but with some loctite should be ok considering I wasn't even going to go there.....but I just did some reading elsewhere and even though I see guys have done exactly what I just did the consensus seems to be; drill and tap! So I'm going to do it. Free hand on the stand. I also just read that this crank could be forged which can make the drilling a little more tedious than drilling a cast one. Here are the pics of my "hub" ..It's a solid steel no rubber jobby. After reading some it seems some folks are unaware that GM did this back when..



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Poncho Master!

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Any numbers on the balancer? Havent seen one like that. But I havent seen that many original balances.

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63 Parisienne sport coupe (The Big GTO), black, maroon interior, 409 4 speed; former owner of a 59 El Camino, 63 Corvette SWC, 62 Chev Bel Air SC. 

Mahone Bay, NS Still not old enough to need an automatic



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IMG_0150.jpgIMG_0153.jpgIMG_0159.jpgHi don, no numbers that are visible on this hub. When I was a kid these hubs were how we identified early 283's. Over on another forum I read that some early 327's may have come out with this hub as well....I do see the odd one for sale on ebay. I went ahead and drilled my crank with the hub in place..



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Canadian Poncho Superstar!

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How was it drilling it Stuart?



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Hey Mark, the hardest part I think was gauging how deep to go. Getting started was easy because there was a tapered hole in the end of the crank so the bit naturally centered itself. I had a brand new 13/64 bit so I used that for a pilot hole followed by the 15/64. I used tapcut cutting oil and WD40 and air to blow it clean.I propped my cordless drill in my groin and pulled against the drill by grabbing onto the rockers near the bell housing giving some extra pressure to the bit. Lots of oil and a few breaks to let me and the bit cool off! The tapping was nervy because it felt like it might bust from the torque and that would really suck... 1/4 turn at a time and back out a little...another 1/4 turn etc. I removed the tap and cleaned it and the hole numerous times to keep a nice clean thread. I did go up town and buy a 2&1/2 inch bolt because I felt the 2" one might be a little short considering it has to "capture" the crank pulleys and enough room for a lock washer......all and all about an hour to do it and yes the crank is hard but the bits were harder!

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Glad it went well for you. Now you have piece of mind!



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IMG_0166.jpgA point of interest...Engine ID on fuel pump boss



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